The Hot Science Behind Copper Cooking Pots

Cast iron. Enameled cast iron. Stainless steel. Carbon steel. Aluminum. Non-stick. Copper. There are many different kinds of cookware, each with their own specific list of pros and cons. When it comes to conducting heat, however, one type claims...

Cast iron. Enameled cast iron. Stainless steel. Carbon steel. Aluminum. Non-stick. Copper. There are many different kinds of cookware, each with their own specific list of pros and cons. When it comes to conducting heat, however, one type claims the premier spot on the pot rack. Copper. Let's take a closer look at why copper cookware is the choice of many professional chefs.

Copper cooking pots

Why Copper Comes Out on Top

The luster of burnished copper is beautiful to behold and makes an attractive addition to any kitchen. In fact, if you've ever admired the glint and gleam of cookware featured in a design magazine, you've likely been gazing upon copper. However, man cannot cook on beauty alone. Functionality is also key, and copper has many benefits in that respect, as well -- beginning with its superior thermal conductivity.

Looking to save time in the kitchen while achieving better outcomes? Think copper. Because copper heats very quickly, it doesn't require much pre-heating -- also making it a terrific choice for chefs with energy savings on their minds.

But that's not all. Copper's amazing conductivity also allows you to reach precise heats, virtually eliminating hot spots and maximizing consistency so food cooks evenly. Furthermore, changing cooking temperatures is a snap when cooking with copper, as adjustments occur almost immediately. The result? Foods which are broiled, browned, and braised to perfection.

And while copper is expensive, it's for a good reason: This cookware is made to last. While some materials quickly degrade and wear out, copper can last for generations.

Owning Copper Cookware 101

If you've made the decision to purchase copper cookware, congratulations! This investment will pay off for years to come. However, there are also some things to keep in mind when it comes to cooking with your new copper pots and pans.

Like all other types of cookware, copper requires some upkeep to maintain its shine and keep corrosion at bay. The good news? Cleaning copper cookware is a simple project and requires only two ingredients you're already likely to have in your kitchen: lemon and salt. Hand-washing and hand-drying will help prevent spotting in order to keep your copper pots and pans looking their best.

One last thing to keep in mind? If you have an induction cooktop, copper cookware won't work with it unless lined with a layer of magnetic material. Why not? Because in induction cooking an electric current is created which generates heat in the pot or pan. In other words: No magnet, no heat.

Copper cooking pots

Additionally, because copper is highly reactive, certain acidic or alkaline foods may acquire a metallic taste when cooked in copper. One solution if you're concerned about changing the taste of your food and/or ingesting trace amounts of copper transferred during the cooking process? Choosing copper cookware lined in either non-reactive stainless steel or tin.

There's a reason why many professional chefs choose to work with copper cooking pots. To get cooking with copper today or to check out our extensive collection of pots and pans suitable for all of your cooking needs, browse cookware at Cilantro The Cooks Shop today.