Tupa: Classic Asian Beef Soup

Tupa: Classic Asian Beef Soup Soup seems to be the universal food. Great for cold days, sick days and busy days, they comfort people everywhere. To give you an idea of how ubiquitous soup is, my friend from Tibet, and she...

Tupa: Classic Asian Beef Soup
Tupa: Classic Asian Beef Soup

Soup seems to be the universal food. Great for cold days, sick days and busy days, they comfort people everywhere. To give you an idea of how ubiquitous soup is, my friend from Tibet, and she makes a beef soup that involves home-made noodles. She learned this traditional soup, called Tupa, at her mother's knee. It's a family favorite and the food of choice for cold days because it is fast and hearty. The only steps that takes patience is making sure the ingredients are chopped thinly and resting the noodle dough. You can make enough for 4 people easily.

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups beef broth
  • 1/2 cup chopped onion
  • 1 clove garlic, chopped roughly
  • 1 tsp ginger, also chopped
  • 1 cup beef, thinly sliced
  • 1/2 cup zucchini, chopped small
  • 1 cup mushrooms, cabbage, and/or broccoli
  • pinch of salt
  • 1 tsp soy sauce
  • 1 tsp oil
  • 8 oz all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 cup water

Directions:

  1. Mix together the flour and water in a mixer for 2-3 minutes. Take it out and form it into a ball, and then cover this with the oil. Let this rest for 30 minutes. Roll out the dough and cut it into strips about an inch wide.
  2. In the meantime, fry the onions, garlic and ginger in a little oil until the onions are translucent. Add the meat and fry that until completely cooked. Pour in the beef broth, lower the temperature and add the vegetables. This you boil for a minute or so to get the veggies warm, and then you throw in the salt and soy sauce.
  3. Now comes the defining moment: adding the noodles. Stretch out the strips of dough until thin and then pinch off pieces. Make sure the pieces are thin and about the width of your thumb. Throw each piece directly into the pot as you pinch them off. You boil this 2 minutes more.

Variations: Throw in chili flakes to make it spicy. We love to top it with cilantro or basil, too. This is an endlessly flexible dish that you can use any vegetable or meat you want in, provided you cut them into little pieces. The original sometimes used yak meat or pork. We have also made it with no meat and using vegetable broth.

My family loves to gather around the pot and throw in the noodles in the group. It's a bonding experience. We always polish it off in one night, too, which is good because the noodles soak up all the broth if you leave it over night.

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